Wild Things: Increased Skunk Activity in the Fall

Are you seeing more skunks these days? It's a busy time for these furry critters that are known for the noxious spray they emit. There are more skunks out there in the fall as the young born earlier in the year are now venturing out on their own. Young male skunks are typically pushed out of the den earlier than females, but now is the time for them to "hit the road," says Willowbrook Wildlife naturalist Stephanie Touzalin. 

The most common and recognized skunk species in North America is the striped skunk, whose range covers most the continental United States. Skunks are extremely adaptable and thrive in many different habitats, as long as food and shelter are available. They rarely travel more than two miles from their established dens, so a skunk typically settles down within two miles of a water source. Skunks are omnivores, so they will eat everything from small rodents to insects.

Because skunk spray is such an effective deterrent, their only predator is the great horned owl, which doesn't have a very good sense of smell. Skunks are more active in the evening and are typically solitary mammals. Skunks are extremely adaptable and thrive in many different habitats, as long as food and shelter are available.

Willowbrook Wildlife Center naturalist Stephanie Touzalin talks more about skunks on Wild Things on WDCB Radio (90.9 FM).  

        

Read more about skunks here.

Living with Skunks 

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